Dupuytrens Contracture Negligence

Pearson Solicitors Medical Negligence are able to investigate and pursue compensation claims related to Dupuytrens Contracture.

Dupuytrens contracture involves thickening of the soft tissues of the palm of the hand and it can lead to a progressive and permanent bend of one or more of the fingers making it difficult to straighten the fingers. The condition can be slowly progressive, affecting all parts of the hand and will occasionally be aggressive.

The exact cause is still unknown although there is thought to be a genetic or environmental element, however, in some cases it is also caused by an injury – either from surgery or from industrial disease such as the long term use of vibrating tools in the workplace.

Treatment involves surgery to excise the affected tissue and is indicated when the hand can no longer be placed flat on a table.

Dupuytrens Contracture negligence

Following the operation, the hand should be splinted at night to keep the fingers extended. During the day, the hand needs to be actively mobilised.

It is important for the surgeon to warn the patient preoperatively of the risks of surgery, which include the following:-

  • Inadvertent damage to the digital nerves
  • Post-operative stiffness of the fingers and pain

It is known that tight bandaging after the operation can cause an interruption of blood supply and scarring of the small muscles in the hand. This can happen even when the finger tips protruding from the bandage have a good circulation. Conversely a less tight bandage can allow the development of a haematoma in the palm which can itself, cause damage with severe pain. It is important therefore, to remove the dressings and inspect the hand during the period of bandaging, particularly in the case of a patient who complains of unusually severe pain.

Dupuytrens Contracture compensation

Pearson Solicitors Medical Negligence team have successfully recovered damages in cases involving defective surgical technique to treat dupuytrens contracture. One particular case also involved inadequate preoperative counselling of the known surgical risks.