Financial & Legal News

Coroners to Examine Suspect Stillbirths

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Jeremy Hunt has announced plans for a change in the law so that coroners can look into stillbirths. The Health Secretary said "all unexplained cases of serious harm or death would now be independently investigated". 

Currently, Coroners can only investigate deaths of babies who show signs of life after being born. The UK has one of the worst stillbirth rates in the western world, according to international studies, and is facing a record £2bn negligence bill fuelled by childbirth blunders.

Jacqui White, a Solicitor in the Medical Negligence team at Pearson, commented, "Jeremy Hunt's proposed plan to halve stillbirths and neonatal and maternal deaths by ensuring that all such tragedies are independently investigated, is welcome in the ongoing fight to improve patient safety".

"Whilst statistics suggest that standards in obstetric and neonatal care have improved over the last 10 years, mothers and babies are still dying avoidably due to negligence. Those babies who survive negligently managed births are left with severe mental and physical deficit. Mr Hunt's plans will hopefully lead to improvements in the standard of care within the NHS and provide answers to families who have experienced such tragedies".

 

If you feel you, or a family member, have been the victim of medical negligence, our specialist medical negligence solicitors are here to help you. Please don't hesitate to contact the team on 0161 785 3500 or email enquiries@pearsonlegal.co.uk. Alternatively, click here for further information.

Please note that the information and opinions contained in this article are not intended to be comprehensive, nor to provide legal advice. No responsibility for its accuracy or correctness is assumed by Pearson Solicitors and Financial Advisers Ltd or any of its members or employees. Professional legal advice should be obtained before taking, or refraining from taking, any action as a result of this article.

This blog was posted some time ago and its contents may now be out of date. For the latest legal position relating to these issues, get in touch with the author - or make an enquiry now.

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