Employment law services for employees

(If you are an employer, you will find information about our employer focused services here: Commercial Employment Law.)

We all have bad days at work from time to time, but when workplace issues deteriorate you may find yourself considering a legal claim against your employer. This is where we can help.

We advise and provide guidance for employees across the North West including Manchester, Oldham, Tameside, Tameside, Rochdale, Salford and Bury. We also represent employees at Employment Tribunals.

Our employment law services

We can help you on a wide range of issues including:

  • age, racial, sexual and disability discrimination
  • benefits
  • breach of contract
  • bullying
  • grievances and disciplinary proceedings
  • harassment,
  • non-payment of wages
  • parental rights
  • redundancy
  • restrictive covenants
  • settlement agreements (previously called compromise agreements)
  • TUPE
  • unfair, constructive and wrongful dismissal

Employment law advice at a reasonable cost

We offer the first consultation by appointment at a fixed hourly rate so that costs are always well controlled.

We strive to minimise your legal costs by using an efficient case management system, by maintaining excellent communications and by 
requesting the relevant documents from you well in advance.

In all cases you can expect straightforward information and advice on your rights, an assessment on the relative legal merits of the case and an idea of the likely associated costs and awards.

If you would like to discuss an employment law issue, contact us to make an appointment.

To find out more about our services contact Susan Mayall, Andrew Murray or Kate Hunter and make an enquiry today.

Latest News

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Individuals Personally Liable for Whistleblowing Dismissal, Court of Appeal Rules

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Court of Appeal Rules Uber Drivers Are Workers

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