Financial & Legal News

INSIGHT: Employment Law changes from 1 October 2015

  • Posted on

Some significant changes to employment law come into force on 1 October 2015.  Here are the key changes you need to know about.

Minimum Wage Increase

The minimum wage will increase on 1 October following the recommendations of the Low Pay Commission in March 2015.

The new rates are as follows:

  New Rate
Adult Rate £6.70
18 to 20 year olds £5.30
16 to17 year olds £3.87
Apprentice Rate £3.30
Accommodation offset £5.35

 

(Source: DBIS press release)

Change to Employment Tribunal Powers

Employment Tribunals will no longer be able to make wider recommendations in discrimination cases. From 1 October, their recommendations will be limited to those relating to the individual complainant. (See The Deregulation Act 2015.)

New exemption on requirement to wear safety helmets for Sikhs

Sikhs in all workplaces will have the right to wear turbans instead of safety helmets.  Currently this right is only allowed on building sites. There are however, various exceptions applying for example, to those who provide an emergency response to hazardous situations (see the Deregulation Act 2015).

Exemptions from H&S laws for the self-employed

Those self-employed people who employ no staff will become exempt from health & safety laws. There are various exceptions (see the Deregulation Act 2015).

For further information, please contact Susan Mayall susan.mayall@pearsonlegal.co.uk or call 0161 785 3500.

Please note that the information and opinions contained in this article are not intended to be comprehensive, nor to provide legal advice. No responsibility for its accuracy or correctness is assumed by Pearson Solicitors and Financial Advisers Ltd or any of its members or employees. Professional legal advice should be obtained before taking, or refraining from taking, any action as a result of this article.

This blog was posted some time ago and its contents may now be out of date. For the latest legal position relating to these issues, get in touch with the author - or make an enquiry now.

    How can we help?

    Please fill in the form and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.